The Last Waltz

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The Last Waltz

The Last Waltz war das Abschiedskonzert der kanadischen Rockband The Band und ist das daraus resultierende Livealbum. Es wurde zum unerreichten Höhepunkt in der Geschichte des Rock: Mit The Last Waltz verabschiedete sich die legendäre Rock-Formation. intrag.eu - Achetez The Band - The Last Waltz by Bob Dylan à petit prix. Livraison gratuite (voir cond.). Retrouvez infos & avis sur une large sélection de DVD.

The Last Waltz Interessante Themen zu diesem Bereich

Es ist der November 16 Jahre Tour liegen hinter ihnen. Es ist das offizielle Abschlusskonzert von `The Band'. Sie wollen, entgegen allen Klischees und Mechanismen des Rock'N'Roll-Zirkus, in Würde eine der größten Musikkarrieren beenden. The Last Waltz war das Abschiedskonzert der kanadischen Rockband The Band und ist das daraus resultierende Livealbum. The Band – The Last Waltz ist ein Film des Regisseurs Martin Scorsese aus dem Jahr In dem Film wird The Last Waltz, das Abschiedskonzert der. intrag.eu: Finden Sie The Last Waltz [Collector's Edition] in unserem vielfältigen DVD- & Blu-ray-Angebot. Gratis Versand durch Amazon ab einem Bestellwert. Seventeen years after joining forces as the backing band for rockabilly cult hero Ronnie Hawkins, Canadian roots rockers The Band call it quits with a lavish. »The Band - The Last Waltz«nannte Regie-Legende Martin Scorsese seine Konzert-Doku, nach dem Titel des Abschiedskonzerts, das die Folk-Rock-Gruppe​. Am November gab die kanadische Rockband The Band ihr Abschiedskonzert im Winterland, San Francisco. Ein unvergessliches Fest, das am Ende.

The Last Waltz

The Band – The Last Waltz ist ein Film des Regisseurs Martin Scorsese aus dem Jahr In dem Film wird The Last Waltz, das Abschiedskonzert der. »The Band - The Last Waltz«nannte Regie-Legende Martin Scorsese seine Konzert-Doku, nach dem Titel des Abschiedskonzerts, das die Folk-Rock-Gruppe​. The Last Waltz war das Abschiedskonzert der kanadischen Rockband The Band und ist das daraus resultierende Livealbum. The Last Waltz DVD ausgewählt Blu-ray Fr. Man, he 13 Eerie - We Prey For You prepared. Ein fantastisches Film-Dokument der besten Begleitgruppe der Rockgeschichte, die jedoch auch als The Band sehr erfolgreich war. Es gibt nicht mal eine Liste der Titel und Musiker. Vielen Dank! Als die Musik noch fesselte Am Etwas vom besten Am Beste Ergebnisse. Juni von thegoodandthebad geschrieben. The film then flashes back to the beginning of the concert, and follows it more Lucy Film less chronologically. Das Muttersöhnchen Address. Taplin Executive Producer. Sign up here. Janet Jessica Barden. Two loose jam sessions then formed. They brought along with them some of their friends, influences, and collaborators. If you only jsut listen to this great music, you can't tell it, but seeing it being performed, you can just tell that there's a lot of pain, frustration, and bitterness going on. The Last Waltz

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Add Article. The Last Waltz Critics Consensus Among one of, if not the best rock movie ever made, The Last Waltz is a revealing, electrifying view of the classic band at their height.

See score details. Rate And Review Submit review Want to see. Super Reviewer. Rate this movie Oof, that was Rotten. What did you think of the movie?

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How did you buy your ticket? View All Photos Movie Info. Seventeen years after joining forces as the backing band for rockabilly cult hero Ronnie Hawkins, Canadian roots rockers The Band call it quits with a lavish farewell show at San Francisco's Winterland Ballroom on Nov.

Filmed by Martin Scorsese, this documentary features standout performances by rock legends such as Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Eric Clapton, Joni Mitchell and Muddy Waters, as well as interviews tracing the group's history and discussing road life.

Martin Scorsese. Robbie Robertson. Apr 18, Last Waltz Inc. Surround, Dolby Stereo. Robbie Robertson Himself. Ringo Starr Himself. Muddy Waters Himself.

Ron Wood Himself. Neil Young Himself. Paul Butterfield Himself. Eric Clapton Himself. Rick Danko Himself. Neil Diamond Himself.

Malcolm John Rebennack Jr. Martin Scorsese Director. Johnson Line Producer. Frank Marshall Line Producer.

Steven Prince Associate Producer. Robbie Robertson Producer. Jonathan T. Taplin Executive Producer. Neil Diamond Original Songs. Michael Chapman Cinematographer.

Vilmos Zsigmond Cinematographer. Boris Leven Production Designer. Five Favourite Films with Nick Love. January 8, Full Review….

May 20, Rating: 2. March 31, Full Review…. December 4, Full Review…. View All Critic Reviews Jun 23, No, "The Weight" is a good song, and it's not the only good song by The Band, as this film will definitely tell you with one heck of a concert that I'd imagine was even better for many of those involved in this concert and film, due to this event's great importance Yeah, I know a concert in the mid-'70s without any drugs is no real concert at all, but come on Martin Scorsese and Neil Young, this isn't Woodstock '99, even though I do like the idea of seeing Scorsese tweaking out with his eyebrows frizzed up.

Maybe Bob Dylan didn't want to be filmed because he was worried about people making cocaine-related jokes about his nose, seeing as how he couldn't have honestly been worried about this film driving attention away from "Renaldo and Clara", even though it was bound to be a huge success, what with its experimental structure, low-profile limited release, weak critical reception and four-hour runtime.

They say that Dylan was finally convinced to give the okay for his being filmed because he was informed that this film would be released months after "Renaldo and Clara", but by the time January 's "Renaldo and Clara" was finished, this film would have been a week into its April release, so that white hat and possible fear of jokes involving white powder had to have been the only things on his mind at this time.

I mean, he had to have known that this film was going to be the success that it ended up being, and justly so, because, again, this is a heck of a show, and it makes for a heck of a film, which isn't to say that "Renaldo and Clara" is the '78 film featuring Bob Dylan that has problems.

The film tacks on some interview material, which certainly adds to the entertainment value with some interesting information, but if Martin Scorsese is going to go as far as to incorporate more depth to this documentary, then he may as well go further, yet ultimately doesn't, or at least not as much as he probably should, putting no real structure to the interviews that ultimately give you only so much information to digest.

The problems within the usage of the interviews are very light, yet they do dilute momentum a smidge by thinning out certain areas in depth that probably shouldn't have been present to begin with, even if their purpose is kind of noble.

Scorsese attempts to break up the repetition of straightforward concert footage with the backstage material, yet ends up making that structural concept formulaic, to where, after a while, the documentary ends up feeling more repetitious than it probably would have been if it had just stuck with the aimless concert material, which does indeed still taint the focal structure of this film as a documentary.

Jeez, speaking of monotony, I'm really trying to crowbar in discussions of flaws, but either way, the fact of the matter is that this ambitious project incorporates somewhat unnecessary aspects that end up being flawed by their own right, to the detriment of the final product that it was trying to ameliorate with the flawed questionable touch-ups.

In all fairness, in a lot of ways, the additional touches to this documentary do, in fact, color things up, but they add a few light blemishes that don't really belong, and that actually leaves you to focus upon the final product's natural shortcomings, because at the end of the day, it's all about the concert, which is, of course, a strong show, but not quite strong enough to make a feature film all that terribly upstanding.

There's not a whole lot that's wrong with this film, but that's partially because there's simply not much at all to the film, which is rewarding, - partially because of the theatrical touches that work, and largely because it simply revolves around a good show - but not quite with enough kick to be all that strong of a film.

With that said, while the lack of meat emphasizes what shortcomings there are, it all emphasizes what strengths there, and let me tell you, there are plenty of strengths to this documentary, not just as a showcase of fine musicianship, but as a well-polished cinematic effort.

Like I said, The Band's Thanksgiving farewell concert of , which drives this film, isn't quite strong enough to make the final product truly upstanding, and it doesn't help that some of the performances kind of run together, if not feature the occasional monotonous spell within themselves, but on the whole, it's hard to deny that this is a heck of a show, featuring a generally dynamic and plentiful set of classic and thoroughly entertaining songs that go brought to life by the charismatic presence and sharp musicianship of The Band and its guest collaborators.

Not every song is strong, but most every piece of this concert presented in this documentary proves to a thoroughly entertaining display of what people would be missing once The Band broke up, so as a showcase of inspired, well-done and all around fine live performances, this film excels.

Of course, there is a bit more to this film than just good songs, and as I said earlier, that's not always a good thing, as the non-musical theatrical supplements to the range of this documentary often get to be a bit too undercooked for their own good, but just as much as, if not more than they are problematic, such touches as backstage material breathe some life into this film, whether when it's charmingly displaying The Band merely hanging out, or presenting interviews that, while superficial in their depth, give you some degree of insight into the history of The Band through plenty of interesting, maybe even humbling stories.

There's a certain heart to the musicians as they tell their tale, and such a heart goes matched only by the heart within Martin Scorsese's direction, which structures scenes in a way that keeps the liveliness of the music pumping the film with consistent entertainment value, broken up by a degree of resonance, summoned from the warmly well-presented more soulful numbers.

Not all of Scorsese's touches work, but the ambition within his direction backs genuine inspiration that brings enough of the entertainment value to life for the shortcomings to go overcome, maybe not to where you end up with an excellent film, but certainly to where you end up with quite the thoroughly enjoyable rock film.

When the waltz is done, somewhat superficial interviews and a repetitious structure prove to be light issues that go a long way in emphasizing the natural shortcomings that secure the final product as far from excellent, but not so far from enjoyment that lovely cinematography, generally interesting backstage filler, heartfelt direction and a strong concert that stands at the end of it all aren't able to make Martin Scorsese's "The Last Waltz" a rewarding and thoroughly entertaining tribute to and showcase of the talent of a group as legendary as The Band.

Cameron J Super Reviewer. Apr 16, Just saw this on the big screen for the first time in What an amazing lot of talent on one stage at one time.

I saw it as a series at a local art house and there was a film professor from Local U pontificating before the film about how this movie made him hate Martin Scorsese--said he was a big egomaniac--so I was interested to see what that was all about and all I can say is I'm glad I didn't become a film major if all film profs are such jackasses.

Scorsese was basically invisible--he was just the guy the Band members were talking to, in fact he seemed a little nervous--the cinematography was beautiful and the music was out of this world.

I had never heard Joni Mitchell sing Coyote. It was a real story, too, about why the band was breaking up after 16 years on the road.

Probably the best documentary about a band I've seen. Bathsheba M Super Reviewer. Nov 29, Thursday November 25th, Thanksgiving Day.

On that night, one of the most momentous events in music history took place. For on that night, The Band decided to call it a day as a group and have a farewell concert at the Winterland in San Francisco to mark the occasion.

They brought along with them some of their friends, influences, and collaborators. Martin Scorsese was brought along to document the occasion.

This film, released two years later is the result. Well, not to diminish the impact, but it's only part of the result. All in all, the full uncut concert was five hours long.

Man, I'd kill to see all of it. Too bad I'll probably never get the chance. Anyway, let's get on with it shall we. John, Neil Young, and Eric Clapton.

I think it's pretty fair and obvious to say that obviously Robbie and Co. Not only is this an epic and brilliant concert, it's just a wonderful celebration of an interesting period of music during an even more interesting time for both music and society.

The mid 70s were a curious time, and this film really helps capture the essence. All of these people onstage love msuic, but you can just tell they're all weary and burnt out, and in need of revitilization.

If you only jsut listen to this great music, you can't tell it, but seeing it being performed, you can just tell that there's a lot of pain, frustration, and bitterness going on.

You'd think that because I am a huge fan of Scorsese, a fan of 60s and 70s rock music thus a fan of most people that are featured here , and have both a scholarly and general interest in the 70s that I probably would have already seen this movie lke times by now.

Surprisingly no. For whatever reason, I didn't get around to this until now. Obviously I'm happy I finally did it, but still, I can't help but feel like I'm less complete for having waited so long.

Don't be like me and make that mistake. Go out and see this film as soon as you can. It's got great music, is fascinating to watch, and is shot and directed superbly.

Though the other band members did not agree with Robertson's decision, the concert was set at Bill Graham 's Winterland Ballroom , where The Band had made its debut as a group in Promoted and organized by Bill Graham , whose home turf was Winterland and who had a long association with The Band, the concert was an elaborate affair.

There was ballroom dancing with music by the Berkeley Promenade Orchestra. They were backed by a large horn section with charts arranged by Allen Toussaint and other musicians.

They were then joined by a succession of guest artists, starting with Ronnie Hawkins. As the Hawks, The Band served as Hawkins' backing band in the early s.

John took a seat at the piano for his signature song, "Such a Night". As Clapton was taking his first solo on " Further on Up the Road ", his guitar strap came loose.

Clapton said "Rob! Neil Young followed, singing " Helpless " with backing vocals by Joni Mitchell who remained off stage. Mitchell came on after Young and sang three songs, two with the backing of Dr.

John on congas. Neil Diamond was next, introducing his "Dry Your Eyes" by saying, "I'm only gonna do one song, but I'm gonna do it good.

Diamond's appearance was not popular with all of the other performers. In his autobiography, Levon Helm was critical of the inclusion of Diamond, not discerning any musical connection to The Band.

A persistent rumor claims that when Diamond came off stage he remarked to Dylan, "Follow that," to which Dylan responded, "What do I have to do, go on stage and fall asleep?

The Band then performed a short set of some more of its songs before Bob Dylan came on stage to lead his former backing band through four songs.

Dylan, who wrote the song, and Manuel, whose falsetto rendition had made the song famous on Music from Big Pink , shared lead vocals, although Manuel cannot be clearly seen in the film and switched between his normal and falsetto voices between verses.

Two loose jam sessions then formed. John on piano, Paul Butterfield on harmonica and Ringo Starr on drums. It was followed by "Jam 2" with the same personnel minus Robertson and Danko.

Stephen Stills , who showed up late, took a guitar solo and Carl Radle joined on bass. It was the last time the group performed under the name "The Band" with its classic lineup.

The five joined stage at a Rick Danko concert in John and Joe Cocker. The stage and lighting were designed by Boris Leven , who had been the production designer on such musical films as West Side Story and The Sound of Music.

With Bill Graham 's assistance, the set from the San Francisco Opera 's production of La traviata was rented as a backdrop for the stage.

Crystal chandeliers were also hung over the stage. John Simon, who ran the rehearsals for the show, would give Scorsese details as to who sang what and who soloed when for each song.

Scorsese meticulously storyboarded the songs, setting up lighting and camera cues to fit the lyrics of the songs. But despite his planning, in the rigors of the live concert setting, with the loud rock music and the hours spent filming the show, there were unscripted film reloads and camera malfunctions.

It was not possible for all songs to be covered. Notably omitted from the film is Stephen Stills , who only performed in a jam session.

Both jam sessions were omitted from the film entirely. While Bob Dylan had agreed to perform in concert, he did not want his appearance filmed because he feared it would detract from his own film project Renaldo and Clara.

Backstage negotiations took place during an intermission. Robertson assured Dylan that the concert film's release would be delayed until after his film, and with that Dylan relented and agreed to be filmed.

Promoter Bill Graham was also involved in the talks. Shoot him! He comes from the same streets as you. Don't let him push you around.

Scorsese has said that during this period, he was using cocaine heavily. The Band's performance of " The Weight " with the Staple Singers was included in the film instead of the concert version.

The Band and Harris performed "Evangeline", which was also included in the film. Finally, according to musical director John Simon, during post-production the live recording was altered to clean up "playing mistakes, out-of tune singing, bad horn-balance in the remote truck.

The film has been hailed critically, listed among the greatest concert films. The website's critical consensus reads, "Among one of, if not the best rock movie ever made, The Last Waltz is a revealing, electrifying view of the classic band at their height.

Ebert awarded the film three stars out of a possible four, noting "the film is such a revealing document of a time," but also stating,.

The overall tenor of [ The Last Waltz ] suggests survivors at the ends of their ropes. They dress in dark, cheerless clothes, hide behind beards, hats and shades, pound out rote performances of old hits, don't seem to smile much at their music or each other.

There is the whole pointless road warrior mystique, of hard-living men whose daily duty it is to play music and get wasted. They look tired of it.

These are not musicians at the top of their art, but laborers on the last day of the job. Look in their eyes.

Read their body language This is not a record of serene men, filled with nostalgia, happy to be among friends The music probably sounds fine on a CD.

Certainly it is well-rehearsed. But the overall sense of the film is of good riddance to a bad time.

Levon Helm , in his autobiography This Wheel's on Fire , expresses serious reservations about Scorsese's handling of the film, claiming that Scorsese and Robbie Robertson who produced the film conspired to make The Band look like Robbie Robertson's sidemen.

He states that Robertson, who is depicted singing powerful backing vocals, was actually singing into a microphone that was turned off throughout most of the concert a typical practice during their live performances.

Helm also discusses Manuel's and Hudson's minimal screen time, such as when Manuel sings during the closing number " I Shall Be Released ", but Manuel is hidden behind the phalanx of guest performers.

There are several shots catching Ronnie Hawkins looking around but not singing, yet Manuel remains invisible. However, during the same segment, in the background, it appears that a cameraman is attempting to get a shot of Manuel at the piano but gives up due to technical problems or the impossibility of the shot.

Helm went so far as to say that Last Waltz was "the biggest fuckin' rip-off that ever happened to the Band", citing that he, Manuel, Danko and Hudson never received any money for the various home videos, DVDs and soundtracks released by Warner Bros.

For the concert's 25th anniversary in , the film was remastered and a new theatrical print was made for a limited release to promote the release of the DVD and four-CD box set of the film soundtrack.

It opened in San Francisco's Castro Theatre , [14] with the release later expanded to 15 theaters. The DVD features a commentary track by Robertson and Scorsese, a featurette , Revisiting The Last Waltz , and a gallery of images from the concert, the studio filming and the film premiere.

A bonus scene is footage of "Jam 2", which is cut short because they had run out of replacement sound synchronizers for the cameras after ten hours of continuous filming.

The original DVD release was packaged as a "special edition". In addition to the extra features on the disc, the Amaray case came in a foil-embossed cardboard sleeve, and inside was an eight-page booklet, featuring a five-page essay by Robertson entitled "The End of a Musical Journey".

In , the DVD was re-issued with different artwork and stripped of the outer foil packaging, inner booklet and coupon; the disc's contents remained unchanged.

In , The Last Waltz was among the first eight titles released in Sony 's high definition Blu-ray format. The original soundtrack album was a three-LP album released on April 16, later as a two-disc CD.

John Casado designed the packaging and logotype trademark. Robbie Robertson produced the album, remastering all the songs.

The set includes 16 previously unreleased songs from the concert, as well as takes from rehearsals. The soundtrack recordings underwent post-concert production featuring heavy use of overdubbing and re-sequencing.

Bootleg collectors have circulated an original line recording of the concert as a more accurate and complete document of the event.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the rock concert and film. For other uses, see The Last Waltz disambiguation.

Original theatrical release poster. Robbie Robertson Jonathan Taplin. Release date. Running time. British Board of Film Classification.

intrag.eu - Achetez The Band - The Last Waltz by Bob Dylan à petit prix. Livraison gratuite (voir cond.). Retrouvez infos & avis sur une large sélection de DVD. Die CD The Band: The Last Waltz (CD-Format) jetzt probehören und portofrei für 20,99 Euro kaufen. Mehr von The Band gibt es im Shop. Es wurde zum unerreichten Höhepunkt in der Geschichte des Rock: Mit The Last Waltz verabschiedete sich die legendäre Rock-Formation. Perhaps the greatest rock documentary ever made, Martin Scorsese s The Last Waltz captures what was advertised as legendary rock group The Band s final. The Band im Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco, hier unter anderem mit Joni Mitchell (Dritte von links) und Bob Dylan (Zweiter von rechts). Genre Pop, Rock. Robbie Robertson erinnert sich zurück:. Sehr gut. Zusammen mit den Hintergrundberichten und den nachträglichen Interviews ergibt sich einer Godzilla 2 Kritik allerbesten Musikfilme, der in jede Sammlung gehört. Hauptinhalt anzeigen. EUR 10,50 Versand. The Band waren Joseph M’Barek der besten Rock n Roll-Bands der 60er und Tv Today Kundenservice 70er. Inhalt Artikel bewerten: Durchschnittliche Bewertung: 4.

The Last Waltz Willanders Album des Monats: The Band mit „The Last Waltz 40th“

EUR 32,00 Versand. Zusammen spielten sie: I shall Franz Lambert released. Hauptinhalt anzeigen. Wir freuen uns deshalb Redemption Stream Deutsch jede Nachricht und beantworten alle E-Mails schnell, kompetent und gerne. Easy Listening. Sortieren: Beste Ergebnisse. Deine Rückmeldung hilft uns, CeDe.

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Please click the link below to receive your verification email. Cancel Resend Email. Add Article. The Last Waltz Critics Consensus Among one of, if not the best rock movie ever made, The Last Waltz is a revealing, electrifying view of the classic band at their height.

See score details. Rate And Review Submit review Want to see. Super Reviewer. Rate this movie Oof, that was Rotten. What did you think of the movie?

Step 2 of 2 How did you buy your ticket? Let's get your review verified. Fandango AMCTheatres. More Info. Submit By opting to have your ticket verified for this movie, you are allowing us to check the email address associated with your Rotten Tomatoes account against an email address associated with a Fandango ticket purchase for the same movie.

How did you buy your ticket? View All Photos Movie Info. Seventeen years after joining forces as the backing band for rockabilly cult hero Ronnie Hawkins, Canadian roots rockers The Band call it quits with a lavish farewell show at San Francisco's Winterland Ballroom on Nov.

Filmed by Martin Scorsese, this documentary features standout performances by rock legends such as Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Eric Clapton, Joni Mitchell and Muddy Waters, as well as interviews tracing the group's history and discussing road life.

Martin Scorsese. Robbie Robertson. Apr 18, Last Waltz Inc. Surround, Dolby Stereo. Robbie Robertson Himself. Ringo Starr Himself. Muddy Waters Himself.

Ron Wood Himself. Neil Young Himself. Paul Butterfield Himself. Eric Clapton Himself. Rick Danko Himself. Neil Diamond Himself. Malcolm John Rebennack Jr.

Martin Scorsese Director. Johnson Line Producer. Frank Marshall Line Producer. Steven Prince Associate Producer.

Robbie Robertson Producer. Jonathan T. Taplin Executive Producer. Neil Diamond Original Songs. Michael Chapman Cinematographer.

Vilmos Zsigmond Cinematographer. Boris Leven Production Designer. Five Favourite Films with Nick Love. January 8, Full Review….

May 20, Rating: 2. March 31, Full Review…. December 4, Full Review…. View All Critic Reviews Jun 23, No, "The Weight" is a good song, and it's not the only good song by The Band, as this film will definitely tell you with one heck of a concert that I'd imagine was even better for many of those involved in this concert and film, due to this event's great importance Yeah, I know a concert in the mid-'70s without any drugs is no real concert at all, but come on Martin Scorsese and Neil Young, this isn't Woodstock '99, even though I do like the idea of seeing Scorsese tweaking out with his eyebrows frizzed up.

Maybe Bob Dylan didn't want to be filmed because he was worried about people making cocaine-related jokes about his nose, seeing as how he couldn't have honestly been worried about this film driving attention away from "Renaldo and Clara", even though it was bound to be a huge success, what with its experimental structure, low-profile limited release, weak critical reception and four-hour runtime.

They say that Dylan was finally convinced to give the okay for his being filmed because he was informed that this film would be released months after "Renaldo and Clara", but by the time January 's "Renaldo and Clara" was finished, this film would have been a week into its April release, so that white hat and possible fear of jokes involving white powder had to have been the only things on his mind at this time.

I mean, he had to have known that this film was going to be the success that it ended up being, and justly so, because, again, this is a heck of a show, and it makes for a heck of a film, which isn't to say that "Renaldo and Clara" is the '78 film featuring Bob Dylan that has problems.

The film tacks on some interview material, which certainly adds to the entertainment value with some interesting information, but if Martin Scorsese is going to go as far as to incorporate more depth to this documentary, then he may as well go further, yet ultimately doesn't, or at least not as much as he probably should, putting no real structure to the interviews that ultimately give you only so much information to digest.

The problems within the usage of the interviews are very light, yet they do dilute momentum a smidge by thinning out certain areas in depth that probably shouldn't have been present to begin with, even if their purpose is kind of noble.

Scorsese attempts to break up the repetition of straightforward concert footage with the backstage material, yet ends up making that structural concept formulaic, to where, after a while, the documentary ends up feeling more repetitious than it probably would have been if it had just stuck with the aimless concert material, which does indeed still taint the focal structure of this film as a documentary.

Jeez, speaking of monotony, I'm really trying to crowbar in discussions of flaws, but either way, the fact of the matter is that this ambitious project incorporates somewhat unnecessary aspects that end up being flawed by their own right, to the detriment of the final product that it was trying to ameliorate with the flawed questionable touch-ups.

In all fairness, in a lot of ways, the additional touches to this documentary do, in fact, color things up, but they add a few light blemishes that don't really belong, and that actually leaves you to focus upon the final product's natural shortcomings, because at the end of the day, it's all about the concert, which is, of course, a strong show, but not quite strong enough to make a feature film all that terribly upstanding.

There's not a whole lot that's wrong with this film, but that's partially because there's simply not much at all to the film, which is rewarding, - partially because of the theatrical touches that work, and largely because it simply revolves around a good show - but not quite with enough kick to be all that strong of a film.

With that said, while the lack of meat emphasizes what shortcomings there are, it all emphasizes what strengths there, and let me tell you, there are plenty of strengths to this documentary, not just as a showcase of fine musicianship, but as a well-polished cinematic effort.

Like I said, The Band's Thanksgiving farewell concert of , which drives this film, isn't quite strong enough to make the final product truly upstanding, and it doesn't help that some of the performances kind of run together, if not feature the occasional monotonous spell within themselves, but on the whole, it's hard to deny that this is a heck of a show, featuring a generally dynamic and plentiful set of classic and thoroughly entertaining songs that go brought to life by the charismatic presence and sharp musicianship of The Band and its guest collaborators.

Not every song is strong, but most every piece of this concert presented in this documentary proves to a thoroughly entertaining display of what people would be missing once The Band broke up, so as a showcase of inspired, well-done and all around fine live performances, this film excels.

Of course, there is a bit more to this film than just good songs, and as I said earlier, that's not always a good thing, as the non-musical theatrical supplements to the range of this documentary often get to be a bit too undercooked for their own good, but just as much as, if not more than they are problematic, such touches as backstage material breathe some life into this film, whether when it's charmingly displaying The Band merely hanging out, or presenting interviews that, while superficial in their depth, give you some degree of insight into the history of The Band through plenty of interesting, maybe even humbling stories.

There's a certain heart to the musicians as they tell their tale, and such a heart goes matched only by the heart within Martin Scorsese's direction, which structures scenes in a way that keeps the liveliness of the music pumping the film with consistent entertainment value, broken up by a degree of resonance, summoned from the warmly well-presented more soulful numbers.

Not all of Scorsese's touches work, but the ambition within his direction backs genuine inspiration that brings enough of the entertainment value to life for the shortcomings to go overcome, maybe not to where you end up with an excellent film, but certainly to where you end up with quite the thoroughly enjoyable rock film.

When the waltz is done, somewhat superficial interviews and a repetitious structure prove to be light issues that go a long way in emphasizing the natural shortcomings that secure the final product as far from excellent, but not so far from enjoyment that lovely cinematography, generally interesting backstage filler, heartfelt direction and a strong concert that stands at the end of it all aren't able to make Martin Scorsese's "The Last Waltz" a rewarding and thoroughly entertaining tribute to and showcase of the talent of a group as legendary as The Band.

Cameron J Super Reviewer. Apr 16, Just saw this on the big screen for the first time in What an amazing lot of talent on one stage at one time.

I saw it as a series at a local art house and there was a film professor from Local U pontificating before the film about how this movie made him hate Martin Scorsese--said he was a big egomaniac--so I was interested to see what that was all about and all I can say is I'm glad I didn't become a film major if all film profs are such jackasses.

Scorsese was basically invisible--he was just the guy the Band members were talking to, in fact he seemed a little nervous--the cinematography was beautiful and the music was out of this world.

I had never heard Joni Mitchell sing Coyote. It was a real story, too, about why the band was breaking up after 16 years on the road. Probably the best documentary about a band I've seen.

Bathsheba M Super Reviewer. Nov 29, Thursday November 25th, Thanksgiving Day. On that night, one of the most momentous events in music history took place.

For on that night, The Band decided to call it a day as a group and have a farewell concert at the Winterland in San Francisco to mark the occasion.

They brought along with them some of their friends, influences, and collaborators. Martin Scorsese was brought along to document the occasion.

This film, released two years later is the result. Well, not to diminish the impact, but it's only part of the result. All in all, the full uncut concert was five hours long.

Man, I'd kill to see all of it. Too bad I'll probably never get the chance. Anyway, let's get on with it shall we.

John, Neil Young, and Eric Clapton. I think it's pretty fair and obvious to say that obviously Robbie and Co. Not only is this an epic and brilliant concert, it's just a wonderful celebration of an interesting period of music during an even more interesting time for both music and society.

Ebert awarded the film three stars out of a possible four, noting "the film is such a revealing document of a time," but also stating,.

The overall tenor of [ The Last Waltz ] suggests survivors at the ends of their ropes. They dress in dark, cheerless clothes, hide behind beards, hats and shades, pound out rote performances of old hits, don't seem to smile much at their music or each other.

There is the whole pointless road warrior mystique, of hard-living men whose daily duty it is to play music and get wasted.

They look tired of it. These are not musicians at the top of their art, but laborers on the last day of the job.

Look in their eyes. Read their body language This is not a record of serene men, filled with nostalgia, happy to be among friends The music probably sounds fine on a CD.

Certainly it is well-rehearsed. But the overall sense of the film is of good riddance to a bad time. Levon Helm , in his autobiography This Wheel's on Fire , expresses serious reservations about Scorsese's handling of the film, claiming that Scorsese and Robbie Robertson who produced the film conspired to make The Band look like Robbie Robertson's sidemen.

He states that Robertson, who is depicted singing powerful backing vocals, was actually singing into a microphone that was turned off throughout most of the concert a typical practice during their live performances.

Helm also discusses Manuel's and Hudson's minimal screen time, such as when Manuel sings during the closing number " I Shall Be Released ", but Manuel is hidden behind the phalanx of guest performers.

There are several shots catching Ronnie Hawkins looking around but not singing, yet Manuel remains invisible. However, during the same segment, in the background, it appears that a cameraman is attempting to get a shot of Manuel at the piano but gives up due to technical problems or the impossibility of the shot.

Helm went so far as to say that Last Waltz was "the biggest fuckin' rip-off that ever happened to the Band", citing that he, Manuel, Danko and Hudson never received any money for the various home videos, DVDs and soundtracks released by Warner Bros.

For the concert's 25th anniversary in , the film was remastered and a new theatrical print was made for a limited release to promote the release of the DVD and four-CD box set of the film soundtrack.

It opened in San Francisco's Castro Theatre , [14] with the release later expanded to 15 theaters. The DVD features a commentary track by Robertson and Scorsese, a featurette , Revisiting The Last Waltz , and a gallery of images from the concert, the studio filming and the film premiere.

A bonus scene is footage of "Jam 2", which is cut short because they had run out of replacement sound synchronizers for the cameras after ten hours of continuous filming.

The original DVD release was packaged as a "special edition". In addition to the extra features on the disc, the Amaray case came in a foil-embossed cardboard sleeve, and inside was an eight-page booklet, featuring a five-page essay by Robertson entitled "The End of a Musical Journey".

In , the DVD was re-issued with different artwork and stripped of the outer foil packaging, inner booklet and coupon; the disc's contents remained unchanged.

In , The Last Waltz was among the first eight titles released in Sony 's high definition Blu-ray format. The original soundtrack album was a three-LP album released on April 16, later as a two-disc CD.

John Casado designed the packaging and logotype trademark. Robbie Robertson produced the album, remastering all the songs. The set includes 16 previously unreleased songs from the concert, as well as takes from rehearsals.

The soundtrack recordings underwent post-concert production featuring heavy use of overdubbing and re-sequencing. Bootleg collectors have circulated an original line recording of the concert as a more accurate and complete document of the event.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the rock concert and film. For other uses, see The Last Waltz disambiguation. Original theatrical release poster.

Robbie Robertson Jonathan Taplin. Release date. Running time. British Board of Film Classification. May 9, Retrieved November 25, Chicago Tribune.

Archived from the original on October 13, Retrieved January 7, Retrieved April 25, December 11, New York, NY. Retrieved December 11, The Independent.

Rolling Stone. December 14, Retrieved September 15, San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved January 6, Ian Christie, p. Sunday Herald.

Archived from the original on January 26, Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on August 25, Retrieved January 8, Something Else! Retrieved January 30, Issue Rotten Tomatoes.

Total Film. The New York Times. Published April 29, Retrieved June 12, Chicago Sun-Times. This Wheel's on Fire.

Chicago: A Capella Books. London: Plexus. Box Office Mojo. Ars Technica. Retrieved March 7, The Band website. Retrieved October 12, Retrieved July 27, GfK Entertainment in German.

Steffen Hung Hung Medien. Retrieved August 21, Sverigetopplistan Chart in Swedish. The Official Charts Company. British Phonographic Industry. Select videos in the Format field.

Select Platinum in the Certification field.

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THE LAST WALTZ - (ENGELBERT HUMPERDINCK / Lyrics)

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Artikelstandort Alle ansehen. Trotzdem würde ich beim nächsten Mal eine der anderen teureren Versionen des gleichen Konzertes kaufen, denn die Dokumentation ist mir zu mickrig, sie besteht eigentlich nur aus einer Werbebrochure für andere Scouts Vs Zombies. Höhepunkte gibt es haufenweise, für mich vor allem die Auftritte von Neil Young mit "Helpless", das Gitarren-Duo Robertson-Clapton oder mit Emmylou Harris, das allerdings aus einem anderen Konzert eingefügt wurde. Weitere Suchfilter Weitere Suchfilter Dezember von Legende Film geschrieben. An diesem legendären letzten Konzert der Band waren ihre Vorbilder Elli Und Ben Weggefährten vetreten. Für Mitteilungen an CeDe. There seems to be a Uwe Abel serving the request at this time. Als die Musik noch fesselte Am

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Dieser Beitrag hat 3 Kommentare

  1. Zulkibei

    Wer Ihnen hat es gesagt?

  2. Brajora

    Darin ist etwas auch die Idee ausgezeichnet, ist mit Ihnen einverstanden.

  3. Goshakar

    Ich entschuldige mich, aber meiner Meinung nach lassen Sie den Fehler zu. Schreiben Sie mir in PM.

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